Americans do some pretty dumb, dangerous things while driving, according to the results of a new Harris poll.

HuffPost

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“Honey, I have to join Ashley Madison.”

So began the pitch I gave my wife to let me join the marrieds-looking-for-affairs website, AshleyMadison.com. It would be part of my research into women who cheat, why infidelity is increasing, and what can be done to possibly affair-proof a marriage. I proposed to “cheat” on her for a few weeks, to talk to and attempt to seduce as many women as possible, and get a real-world understanding of why women want to stay married but also need some illicit action on the side.

The Daily Dot

What women want on the dance floor, according to science

A group of evolutionary biologists looked at the science of bump and grind, and say they have figured out exactly which dance movements catch a woman’s eye.

Chris McKinlay was folded into a cramped fifth-floor cubicle in UCLA’s math sciences building, lit by a single bulb and the glow from his monitor. It was 3 in the morn­ing, the optimal time to squeeze cycles out of the supercomputer in Colorado that he was using for his PhD dissertation. (The subject: large-scale data processing and parallel numerical methods.) While the computer chugged, he clicked open a second window to check his OkCupid inbox.

McKinlay, a lanky 35-year-old with tousled hair, was one of about 40 million Americans looking for romance through websites like Match.com, J-Date, and e-Harmony, and he’d been searching in vain since his last breakup nine months earlier. He’d sent dozens of cutesy introductory messages to women touted as potential matches by OkCupid’s algorithms. Most were ignored; he’d gone on a total of six first dates.

WIRED

Vitamins and minerals could be useful for treating ADHD, research suggests.

Adults with ADHD given supplements for eight weeks had a “modest” improvement in concentration span, hyperactivity, and other symptoms, a small-scale study found.

BBC

What Witchcraft Is Facebook?

September 12, 2013

Mass psychogenic illness—historically known as “mass hysteria”—is making a comeback.

The Atlantic

Admit it, many straight women spend more time checking each other out than they do the opposite sex. Julia Oliphant asks why we’re so obsessed with analysing what she wears, how she dances, what she eats … (the list could go on).

The Telegraph