Gut bacteria play a role in mood and emotion. Are probiotics the key to a better antidepressant?

The Atlantic

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The world’s most powerful computers can’t perform accurate real-time interpreting of one language to another. Yet human interpreters do it with ease. Geoff Watts meets the neuroscientists who are starting to explain this remarkable ability.

BBC

Three times last week, between classes in neuropharmacology, neural systems and journalism, Brown University junior Henry Langton changed into sweatpants, sat with dozens of classmates on cushions in a campus dance studio and meditated on his breath and his body for 25 uninterrupted minutes.

One day, the focus was bamboo breathing, a Zen breath control technique. Another day, it was the Heart Sutra, a Mahayana Buddhist scripture frequently chanted in Zen monasteries. There was also walking meditation, a mindfulness of the body exercise done while moving through the room.

HuffPost

Some people just can’t seem to keep a beat.

You know the ones: They seem to be swaying to their own music or clapping along to a beat only they can hear. You may even think that describes you.

Washington Post

How did a Chinese woman live 24 years missing part of her brain?

Slate

Here’s a title you can’t help but read, even though it’s in a highly technical scholarly journal: “A case of musical preference for Johnny Cash following deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens.”

Washington Post

Researchers still do not know what the future might hold for a generation raised with smartphones and tablets.

NYTimes